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Cover Picture Source By Google Image

An Indian village with no front doors, shops that are always unlocked, and residents who are never feeling unsafe. Anyone can walk into your home or shop in this village there are no doors and no locks. But no one will steal. If someone does, they will suffer from ‘sade-sati’, a period of seven years of bad luck.

This is the story of Shani Shingnapur, a village in India’s Maharashtra state. Where villagers avoid their security because of their undying faith in Lord Shani, the god of Saturn, who is considered the guardian of the village.

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Village house with no door concept
Google Image
Google Image

Story Behind The Doorless Indian Village 

According to legend, a heavy black slab of rock washed up on the shores of the Panasnala River. Which once flowed through the village, about 300 years ago after a bout of rain and flooding. When a local shepherd touched the 1.5m boulder with a stick, blood started oozing out of it. Lord Shani appeared in the shepherd’s dreams later that night, telling him that the stone was his idol. The shepherd asked the Lord for permission to build a temple for him, but he refused. He wanted to be placed in the heart of the village without shelter, so he could look over around freely. He promised the shepherd that he will protect the village from any dangers and mishaps.

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Loard Sani temple  In Shinganapur
Loard Sani temple In Shinganapur (Google Image)

Faith In The God

Since this day, the village has placed all its faith in god. The villagers installed the huge slab on a roofless platform in the heart of town, they decided to discard all doors and locks. They didn’t need them anymore, not with the Lord to watch over them. This remote Indian village, Shani Shingnapur attracts devotees from across India. At least 40,000 visitors pour in each day to see the once-humble shrine that has grown into a large temple with extensive property and donations.

Google Image

Now It Is A 300 Year Old Tradition

This tradition has continued for generations. Locals sometimes lean wooden panels against their front door frames to keep stray dogs out, but they don’t have permanent doors. Villagers leave their jewellery and money unsecured, firmly believing that their holy guardian will protect them from any mishap. Local lore says that a man who built a door outside his home had an accident the next day. Even the public toilets in the village square just have a thin curtain at the entrance for privacy.

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lockless Goverment Office In Shani Shingnapur

Even post offices and police stations do not have doors here. The United Commercial Bank opened its first “lockless” branch in Shani Shingnapur in 2011. It has a glass entrance and a remote-controlled electromagnetic lock that is barely visible to respect the sentiments of the villagers.

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Belief VS Superstition

Although Shani Shingnapur has officially remained free from thefts for centuries. However, many villagers now strongly feel that it is time to get rid of the superstition. Until 2010, Shingnapur had not reported any cases of theft. However the next year, gold ornaments worth Rs70,000 went missing from the home of a temple trustee. The no-door policy has become such an important belief for the village and its economy, that many cases even go unreported. Many peoples argue that the low crime rate in the area is due to the village’s remote location rather than the miraculous powers of the lord.

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Dance Form In Kerala Cover Pictures source By Google Image

Kerala has always been a popular destination for tourists and travelers. Yet, as you journey deeper into the state, it opens up. It offers a rich tapestry of art, music, and equally dance to those who seek it. And it is not wrong to say, Kerala a sanctum of Art. The cultural heritage and equally religious influence have been the main source of birth to many art forms in this land. Known as “God’s own country.

Kerala has around 50 forms of dance. Among these Theyyam, Puli kali, Nangiar Koothu, Koodiyattam, and Ottan Thullal are some of the prominent another dance forms. Kerala is also famous all over the world for these two unique dance forms of Kathakali and Mohiniyattam.

Many of these art forms draw from stories of the epics, ancient folklore, and even more tales from everyday life. And these include exquisite forms with mudras (Finger and palm movements) and also vivid expressions.

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Makeup Is An Important Art

Make-up is an integral part of a number of different Kerala dance forms, be it Kathakali, Theyyam or Ottan Thullal, so much so that it’s taught as a separate discipline at the Kerala Kalamandalam. The make-up process is elaborate also, the colours, usually natural, are extracted from flowers, leaves, stones and soot, and prepared with a coconut oil base. The predominant colour of green, used to depict good, as well as white is for spirituality, red for passion and black for evil.

Kathakali Dance form Kerala
Kathakali (Google Image)

Kathakali

A classical art form, it has its origins almost 1,500 years ago in the southern state of Kerala. Kathakali is a perfect combination of dance, drama, music, and religious theme. Kathakali is one of the oldest styles of world theatre. In Malayalam (the local language of Kerala), Kathakali means Story-Play, “Katha-Story” and “Kali-Play”. Usually, men are performing this dance.

Mohiniyattam dance form Kerala
Mohiniyattam (Google Image)

Mohiniyattam

A famous and elegant classical dance form of Kerala called Mohiniyattam involves graceful movements. Mohiniyattam is a blend of Bharatanatyam and also Kathakali, as it uses the elements of these dances. This dance is very elegant as it has gentle and graceful movements even though along with mesmerizing eye movements. Only solo women perform this classical dance. As the name itself says, Mohini means ‘a maiden’ and Yattam means ‘dance’.

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Theyyam Dance form Kerala
Theyyam (Google Image)

Theyyam

The most interesting fact of Kerala’s art form is that the majority of these have evolved from temple rituals involving the mythological stories of gods and goddesses. Theyyam, one of these types of rituals of North Kerala which said to have 400 variations. Mudras and the facial expressions of the performer enthrall the audience throughout the performance.

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Koodiyattam dance form Kerala
Koodiyattam (Google Image)

Koodiyattam

A traditional performing art form, Koodiyattam is a combination of ancient Sanskrit theatre and Koothu, a Tamil performing art dating from the Sangam era, the period of the history of ancient Tamil Nadu, and Kerala. Koodiyattam is a famous temple dance art form.

Ottan Thullal dance form Kerala
Ottan Thullal (Google Image)

Ottan Thulla

One of the other lesser-known dance forms of Kerala. Whilst in make-up, dress, and movements, it resembles Kathakali, borrowing from the famous dance that was once meant for the upper echelons of society. This ancient art form used to be presented to criticize the kings and leaders of society in a humorous way. This solo performer wears green make-up and elaborates costumes and entertains the audience with hand movements, expressions, and also jumping to evoke laughter from the audience. Ottan thullal needs as well as attention to be preserved as a valuable art form of Kerala as it’s slowly losing its value and existence in the modern era.

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Nangiar Koothu (Google Image)

Nangiar Koothu

Nangyar Koothu or Nangiar koothu is an allied traditional art of Kutiyattam, an age-old Sanskrit drama tradition of India. This dance form, Sree Krishna Charitham, presented by a female performer in the temples. Mudras and the facial expressions of the performer enthrall the audience throughout the performance.

Puli kali dance form Kerala
Puli kali (Google Image)

Puli Kali

It is a recreational folk art from the state of Kerala. Performed by trained artists to entertain people on the occasion of Onam. The annual harvest festival, to entertain revelers, mainly in the Thrissur district of Kerala. Pulikali meaning “play of the tigers”, Pulikali performances revolve around the theme of tiger hunting. The performing artists sport bright body paintings of tigers and hunters in yellow, red, and black.

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Counting happiness is a very difficult task in this world. After all, it is the most important goal we have in our lives. Every year, the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network releases the World Happiness Report. A study that examines the connections between happiness and development. The World Happiness Report 2021 has been especially interesting, as it has taken the effects of COVID-19 into account. It attempted to concentrate on how the pandemic has impacted people’s lives. And how governments around the world have handled the situation. If you’ve been wondering how the rest of the world is coping with all of this chaos. Here’s a rundown of the top five countries where people are still peaceful and happy.

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World’s Happiest Countries 2021

World’s happiest countries 2021
For the fourth year running, Finland has come out on top in the annual list powered by data from the Gallup World Poll. Accordingly, Iceland, Denmark, Switzerland, and the Netherlands following in the second, third, fourth, and fifth positions.

Finland

Finland is yet again the leading happiest country in the world. In fact, this is the fourth consecutive year for the Nordic country. For a long time, the country has been happier than the others. Thanks to some of the best education systems in the world. As of today, the nation is planning to reopen its restaurants, and speed up the vaccination process. As it sees a decline in covid positive cases. Finland has extensive welfare benefits, low levels of corruption, a well-functioning democracy, and an instilled sense of freedom and independence, which is a big part of what makes up the country happy.

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Iceland

Iceland, a nation rich in happiness, is undoubtedly one of the best places to visit, not to mention one of the happiest. The country attracting a large number of tourists each year and for remaining one of the world’s most advanced nations. Its people are tough and resilient, but they are also genuinely kind. Time and time again, the Icelandic people come out top of the UN’s World Happiness Report. Long winters and harsh weather may make living conditions a challenge, but the Icelandic people are incredibly cheerful and optimistic.

Denmark

Nordic countries occupied the top three spots. Denmark is known to be at the top of its game as far as life expectancy, and social support is concerned. Citizens are highly satisfied with their lives because of reliable and extensive welfare benefits, low corruption, well-functioning democracy and freedom, work-life balance and small population. Denmark also has one of the world’s most bike-friendly cities.

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Switzerland

Switzerland is famous for its natural beauty with the Swiss Alps, Lake Geneva, the Eiger, and the Matterhorn. This country is a traveler’s paradise and the only European country in the top five. The nation goes to vote on most decisions. How many vacation days workers should have to how many immigrants should be allowed into the country. And referendums down to the local level happen many times a year. The Swiss are known to be insular, and they believe that every voice matters, which can go a long way toward feeling content.

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Netherlands

The Nordic countries and the Netherlands lead the way in happiness. According to a UNICEF report from back in 2013. Dutch children are the happiest in the world. The nation has remained high on the happiness ranking since 2005. Based on a number of metrics related to educational well-being, safety, and health. The Netherlands performed strongly in terms of social support, life satisfaction, and freedom to make life choices.

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Wearing masks is step number one coming together as a team to help defeat the coronavirus or Covid-19. This is one of the simplest, most important things you can do right now. We have to work together to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. At its core, wearing a mask is an act of kindness and neighbourliness. It’s one of the simplest good deeds you can do these pandemic days, and a great way to be a force of positivity for the people in your life. Only the awareness of all of us can make our world healthy again.

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Why Wearing A Mask Is Important

Your masks help protect those around you. We know the virus spreads easily through the air – by wearing a mask, you’re helping limit the particles you breathe out. Studies show that masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth. You should cover your face, even if you do not feel sick. When everybody wears a mask (infected or not), the coronavirus doesn’t have nearly as much opportunity to spread around. According to a study, found wearing a face mask reduces the chances of infection by over 80%. It’s simple and clear that it helps bring infection numbers way down. That’s why it’s such a crucial step to helping end the pandemic and getting things back to normal.

When And Where Should I Wear A Mask?

Pursuittravellr recommends you wear a mask any time. We should wear our masks as soon as we step out of the door of our house. always cover up your face when you’re in public around other people. Now, this is also very important if you meet or talk to someone then you need to wear a mask. Somehow if you are in any crowded area you should first wear a mask and tell others so that they also wear it too.

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Masks Helps With COVID-19

Masks are more effective when more people wear them. They’re also more effective when more people take other COVID-19 precautions too – like social distancing and frequent hand washing or hand sanitising. Altogether, these steps help bring down the risk of infection for entire communities. Masks are an easy way you can pitch in – it’s doing your part to help fight COVID-19, and that’s something that’s easy to feel good about. The main purpose of wearing a mask is actually to protect others.

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Focus on your breathing

Taking longer, slower breaths while you’re wearing a mask can help you feel calmer and more comfortable. In a safe space (ideally outside), take off your mask and get two or three deep breaths. Your nose is designed to take in moisture, but sometimes this can become difficult when you’re wearing a mask. To stay energized, make sure you’re drinking plenty of fluids.

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Need More Awareness

The use of a mask on a regular basis is important. However, it is just one piece of the puzzle in the battle against the coronavirus and COVID-19. It’s also important to practice social distancing, wash your hands often, and disinfect your home and office frequently. We need to be more aware to fight this pandemic. Be safe & happy.