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Laos Villages Made Out Of Bombs. It is known as Bomb Village. Ban Napia is on the travel list of many tourists visiting Laos. Many signs of the horrors of war can still be seen in the village. When you go to the crop field, you can see that the whole field up to the horizon is full of holes. These holes were caused by the explosion of bombs dropped from the aircraft. Across the green grass-covered field are rows of hills, with some huts in the vicinity. In front of every house there are small plants planted in tubs. The small tub trees look more green than usual in the sun that melts through the gaps in the mountains. In the middle of this beautiful natural scene, you have to stumble suddenly if you look closely at the ‘tub’. Because it’s not a tub, it’s a bomb! Which is now made of patch tub.

This strange scene is seen in Laos, a Southeast Asian country, as a result of the US ‘secret war’, for which the unfortunate Laotians are still suffering forty years later. The residents of this village in Laos have a daily relationship with bombs like five other things. Forty years after the end of the war, they still have to take every step on the ground with the risk of a bomb blast.

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Villages In Laos Destroy By Bomb

Laos is still the world’s most bombed country. The reason for saying secret war is that no one in the world, including America at that time, knew about the war situation in Laos. Everyone just knew that the war was going on in Vietnam. During the Vietnam War, communist guerrillas were supplied with military supplies through the Ho Chi Minh Trail inside Laos. The United States launched a massive bombardment of Laos to cut off supplies, more than the total number used in World War II. During the Vietnam War from 1964 to 1963, US forces dropped a total of 580,000 tons of bombs on Laos. Mathematically, on average, bombs were dropped from the plane every 8 minutes in 24 hours, and this went on for 9 consecutive years.

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The Helpless Villager

Basically, these unexploded ordnance has multiplied the suffering of Laos. Farmers find abandoned bombs under the ground while cultivating land, children pick up bombs while playing in the forest, bombs are found under water while working in ponds. In most cases, these abandoned bombs explode, killing and maiming, most of the victims being children. As of 2012, about 29,000 people were the victims of such accidents. After the end of the war in 1975, the Laotian government began clearing all landmines, bombs, etc. Such work requires highly trained personnel, advanced technology and adequate budgets, none of which the Laos government has. Since then, landmines have been released in small capacity, which is still going on today. In an interview with ABC News in 2016, the Laotian foreign minister said that the technical capabilities of Laos would take almost a century to remove.

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Life Goes On in Laos

But life does not stop, the farmer has to hit the land with a spade, the children will also go to play in the field. People have adapted quite nicely to these bombs. The boundary of the house is being fenced with bomb shells. Sometimes a bombshell is cut into two pieces and made into a flower tub. Cluster bomb shells are being used in restaurants or cafes as ashtrays, and large bomb shells are being used as stoves. You can see in the river that the boat has been made with the fuel tank (drop tank) of the fighter jet. There is no chance of avoiding bombs in the daily life of the people of these places, it occupies the whole heart of the people.

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The Bomb Village

Inside the whole of Laos, a village called ‘Ban Napia’ in Jiangsu Province, known as ‘The Bomb Village’, has been using the abandoned bombs in various ways in its daily activities.First the bomb fuse is carefully defused, then the explosives inside are removed and emptied. The rest of the shell will then turn into a bucket or fence pole depending on its shape. In addition, the shells of these bombs are a major source of local demand for metals. These are melted down to meet the demand for metal for various purposes. Apart from government initiatives, the common man is also coming forward with his own initiative with the help of NGOs to detonate bombs in voluntary shelters. However, the reason why the village of ‘Ban Napia’ has received so much response from various quarters is that,The villagers are melting scrap bombs and making various souvenirs for tourists. These include spoons, key rings, bottle caps, bracelets, etc. Bombay Village Ban Napia is on the travel list of many tourists visiting Laos. Many signs of the horrors of war can still be seen in the village. When you go to the crop field, you can see that the whole field up to the horizon is full of holes. These holes were caused by the explosion of bombs dropped from the aircraft.

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